Midday goes social 2012-2017

    • Inequality and technology

      The impact of technological change on employment and distribution of earnings is a balance between opening up new opportunities and making skills obsolete more quickly, said Omar Arias, manager of Global Engagement and Knowledge for Education at the World Bank at a seminar organised jointly by the EIB Institute, the University of Luxembourg and other partners as part of the “Inequality and…” series.

    • Microfinance and social impact in Italy

      Receiving a loan from PerMicro, one of the most important Italian companies specialising in microcredit, allowed more than 500 micro-entrepreneurs and 1 600 families to access the traditional banking system in six years (2009-2014), said Giulia Boioli and Andrea Limone, both from PerMicro, at a Midday Goes Social seminar.

    • Inequality and well-being

      Economic indicators do not capture the entire picture of inequality, said Martine Durand, Chief Statistician and Director, OECD, at a seminar organised jointly by the EIB Institute, the University of Luxembourg and other partners as part of the “Inequality and…” series.

    • How technology is transforming microfinance

      Fintech (e.g. mobile phone banking, blockchain, peer-to-peer, machine learning) is triggering an existential crisis for microfinance, said Prof. Karl Dayson, University of Salford, Manchester, at an EIB Institute seminar.

    • October Days for Sustainable Development

      How can companies and businesses contribute to implementing Agenda 2030? Conversely, can the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) create value for enterprises? This was the focus of the third session of the October Days for Sustainable Development dedicated to “SDGs and Business”, organised by the Institute and the University of Luxembourg with the support of other partners.

    • Inequality and economic history

      “Europe is no less unequal today than in the Middle Ages although with different standards of living” said Guido Alfani, Associate Professor of Economic History, Bocconi University, at a seminar organised jointly by the EIB Institute, the University of Luxembourg and other partners as part of the “Inequality and…” series.

    • Inequality and macroeconomics

      The relationship between macroeconomics and inequality is a two-way street but macroeconomic theory has been late in taking this aspect into account, said Benjamin Moll of Princeton University, at a seminar organised jointly by the EIB Institute, the University of Luxembourg and other partners as part of the “Inequality and…” series.

    • Inequality and climate change

      Since 1990, growth in developing countries has been responsible for most greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, said Stephan Klasen, University of Göttingen, at a seminar organised jointly by the EIB Institute, the University of Luxembourg and other partners as part of the “Inequality and…” series.

    • Bank financing for SMEs

      “SMEs are the private sector of developing countries” and financing their development is crucial, said Prof Thorsten Beck, from Cass Business School, at a seminar organised by the EIB Group (EIB, EIF and EIB Institute) as part of European SME Week.

    • Inequality and child development

      “Inequality begins at home. It develops from the myriad differences in the ways advantaged and disadvantaged parents interact with their children”, said Ariel Kalil, from University of Chicago, at a seminar organised jointly by the EIB Institute, University of Luxembourg and other partners as part of the “Inequality and…” series.